Sylvestris.

Pinus Sylvestris, the Scots pine, is one of the oldest and most common trees here in Sweden. It grows all over Europe, all the way through central Russia and into eastern Siberia, and once you start really seeing them, they are really quite the sight. Isn’t that a wonderful realisation - that one of the most common things around you is also one of the most beautiful? The Scots pine grow tall, straight, smooth trunks that end in a flat, cloudlike crown. Once they reach a height of around 30 m, they stop growing upwards, and focus all their energy on expanding the crown. The bark is scaly and rough on the lower part of the trunk, but higher up it’s thin and flaky, colouring the upper half in an orange tone.

Photo ID: Two single tall Scots pine trees stand in a foggy field of young fir trees by a pond. The are reflected in the surface of the still water.

Photo ID: Two single tall Scots pine trees stand in a foggy field of young fir trees by a pond. The are reflected in the surface of the still water.

When summer starts to turn her back and we can feel the first breaths of autumn I always have this strange inward-outward feeling. I want to nest and prepare for the cold, dark days to come, but also to hold the last warmth of summer in my hands, just a little longer. Stillness and motion all at once. And even though I love autumn, I know all too well how I can feel in winter. What the cold and dark does to my body and mind, how it’s almost impossible to start moving again once you sit down, and how desperate I am for light when sunset comes at 4 pm. But there are things to cherish. The celestial bodies, for one - the bright nights of summer make it hard to see… well, space. And space always gives me that terrifying yet comforting feeling of being completely insignificant. Soon it will be easier to follow the moon cycle again, to see Vega and the North star and Venus and Mars, the Big dipper (what a ridiculous name it has in English! In Swedish it’s “Karlavagnen”, a likely christianised name for “Oden’s wagon” which we said in the old days), maybe even a meteor shower or a shooting star. And there are the pines. The leaves of the pines don’t fall off at autumn like they do on the deciduous trees in the forest. Instead they remain green all through the year - collecting hoarfrost or the small drops of the thawing ice, adding some colour to the otherwise very grey and brown winter world when there’s no snow. All these things merged into the Sylvestris pendant.

Sylvestris on Stitch 80 cm.  Photo ID: A woman in a black dress in a heather field is wearing a long silver chain from which a pendant with circles and needles hang.

Sylvestris on Stitch 80 cm.

Photo ID: A woman in a black dress in a heather field is wearing a long silver chain from which a pendant with circles and needles hang.

Sylvestris is, like all ELK market metal pendants, hand made by me in my studio. It’s made from 100 % recycled Argentium silver and consists of three circles in different sizes. From the largest cirlce, two long pine needles hang. When the chain is pulled through the center circle, the two largest circles create a crescent shape, but as always, it can be worn in many constellations creating different shapes.

Sylvestris on Stitch 80 cm.  Photo ID: A woman in a black dress in a heather field is wearing a doubled silver chain from which a pendant with circles and needles hang.

Sylvestris on Stitch 80 cm.

Photo ID: A woman in a black dress in a heather field is wearing a doubled silver chain from which a pendant with circles and needles hang.

The two needles are hammered and just like pine needles, they are all alike but no two are the same. Sylvestris will be available in the next shop opening in late August.

Sylvestris on the Stitch chain.  Photo ID: A silver pendant with circles and needles are hanging from a silver chain on a background of burned wood. A branch of green pine rests at the bottom of the picture.

Sylvestris on the Stitch chain.

Photo ID: A silver pendant with circles and needles are hanging from a silver chain on a background of burned wood. A branch of green pine rests at the bottom of the picture.

Lotta H Löthgren